Local News

  • OCC project to help needy children around the world

    Campbellsville University will once again serve as the community’s relay station for the Operation Christmas Child effort.

    OCC is a nationwide effort, coordinated through Samaritan’s Purse, to give packed shoeboxes of gifts, toiletries and school supplies to impoverished children in several countries around the globe and to demonstrate God’s love in a tangible way to children in need around the world. The CU collection station opens today, Monday, and will stay open through next Monday, Nov. 23.

  • Officer Ellis laid to rest

    A week after Richmond police officer Daniel Ellis was shot, many residents and colleagues from around the country gathered at Eastern Kentucky University’s Alumni Coliseum in Richmond Wednesday for his funeral.

    Ellis, 33, was shot while investigating a robbery last Wednesday. He died at University of Kentucky Chandler Hospital Friday.

    “When Daniel sank his teeth into something he just wouldn’t let it go. That’s what he was doing last week,” Richmond Police Chief Larry Brock said during the funeral Friday.

  • Grand jury indicts 26 on various charges

    A man accused of raping a child is among 26 people that a Taylor County Grand Jury indicted last week.

    Edward J. Summers, 22, of Hodgenville Road in Greensburg, Ky., was charged with first-degree rape of a victim under 12 years of age, a Class A felony; and second-degree persistent felony offender.

    The charges stem from a reported incident on July 10, 2014. The Kentucky State Police is investigating the case.

  • Fallen officer laid to rest Wednesday


    A week after Richmond police officer Daniel Ellis was shot, many residents and colleagues from around the country gathered at Eastern Kentucky University's Alumni Coliseum in Richmond Wednesday for his funeral.

    After the service ended around noon, bagpipes were played and officers saluted when Ellis' flag-draped coffin was brought outside the coliseum.

    Officers then headed back to a parking lot full of cruisers to begin the 100-mile procession to an Adair County cemetery for Ellis' burial.

  • Taylor County schools to create new principal position at elementary

    The Taylor County School Board of Education approved creating a new principal position for the elementary school beginning Jan. 4, 2016, Monday night during the regular board meeting.

    Superintendent Roger Cook wants to reconfigure the elementary by separating it from the primary to fifth grade structure to two separate entities, being a primary to second grade and third to fifth grade school. For test score reasons and “for every reason I can think of that’s really what needs to be done,” Cook said.

  • Campbellsville schools get 3-D computers

    Soon students in Campbellsville Independent Schools will have another tool to help them learn with a new piece of technology making its way into the schools – 3-D computers.

    That announcement was made at Monday’s CIS School Board meeting.

    “We are only the fifth district in Kentucky that has these computers,” Superintendent Mike Deaton said.

  • Magistrates question proposed needle program

    Magistrates were skeptical at best of a proposal to open a needle exchange program in Taylor County.

    During a Monday night Taylor County Fiscal Court meeting, many of those magistrates were, however, interested in hearing more information.

  • More charges filed in Ellis murder

    The Kentucky State Police announced late on Friday that they have filed an additional charge against the man who reportedly killed Richmond Police Officer Daniel Ellis.

    Raleigh Sizemore, 34, of Richmond, is now charged with murder of a police officer, two counts of attempted murder of a police officer, first-degree unlawful imprisonment and possession of a handgun by a convicted felon, a KSP report said.

    The new charges, KSP Post 7 Spokesman Robert Purdy said, are the result of the KSP’s ongoing investigation.

  • Tobacco sales declining in the county, state

    Tobacco is in partial decline in the county and the state in general, Dr. William Snell of the University of Kentucky told an audience last week at the UK Extension Office.

    Talking via Skype, Dr. Snell said that while the state’s agricultural economy has increased by 50 percent from 2004-2014 to $6.5 billion, the same cannot be said for tobacco.

    A member of the audience estimated that there are perhaps 100 tobacco farms in the entire county.

    Snell pointed to a loss of $150 million of annual tobacco buyout payments from last year.

  • Teens try their hands at loop braiding

    Teens at the Taylor County Public Library took a step back in time learning the historical art of medieval fingerloop braiding Wednesday.

    Shari Whitehead taught the class who in her spare time researches these types of forgotten arts and then recreates the tools and techniques used.

    "I thought I would try and bring modern flare to it with the kids," Whitehead said.