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Local News

  • Tax rates from health department to decrease

    Property tax rates designed to fund the Taylor County Health Department will drop slightly.

    In a special-called meeting Monday morning, magistrates on the Taylor County Fiscal Court heard from Alicia Griffith of the Taylor County Health Department.

    She told them the Taylor County Board of Health met earlier this year and approved a rate of 3.25 cents per $100 of assessed valuation of real and personal property, as well as motor vehicles.

    The new rates will take effect Jan. 1, 2016.

    The current rate is 4 cents per $100 of assessed valuation.

  • New industry could come to county

     

    A new industry could possibly be moving to Taylor County in the not-too-distant future, Campbellsville Mayor Tony Young said Monday evening.

    "This City Council and Fiscal Court met together, and they are unified in moving forward in our attempts to recruit and be able to bring in new industries to our community," Young said. "We have one company that ... we're hoping they will decide to move here to Campbellsville."

  • Heavy rains affect local crops

     

    There could be as much as a 15-20-percent yield loss countywide for tobacco, mostly because of the rains.

    Pat Hardesty, Taylor County extension agent for agriculture and natural resources, said that while some fields won't produce as much, overall there will likely be "solid" yields this year, especially with regard to corn and soybeans.

    "We have tobacco ... some of it got drowned out from too much water in different patches," Hardesty said. "We also have some bacterial soft rot in some patches."

  • Most local students to receive free meals

     

    When the new school year begins, most parents in the county and city school districts will notice some savings when it comes time to pay for student lunches.

    That's because this year, while students enrolled in Campbellsville Independent Schools will continue to receive free breakfast and lunch, many students in the Taylor County School District will also receive those same benefits.

  • Library announces new hours

    Taylor County Public Library will have largely-expanded evening hours, starting next month.

    “Taylor County Public Library’s mission is to meet the needs of our community,” a press release reads. “In response to a growing number of requests from our patrons, we will be expanding our evening hours beginning August 2015.”

  • More than 3,200 receive heart training at TRH

    Life saving training classes at Taylor Regional Hospital are a net benefit to the community.

    That is what Richard Phillips, American Heart Association Training Center Coordinator at TRH, said late last week.

    “If you’re eating at a restaurant, these classes increase the chances that there will be someone there who can save your life,” Phillips said.

  • Chase ends in kidnapping charges

    A Taylor County man is in jail after being charged with kidnapping and numerous other charges in an incident that took place across at least three counties Thursday.

    Marion Fisher, 34, of Taylor County, is lodged in the Boyle County Detention Center in Danville, Ky. Fisher was arrested after a lengthy incident, according to a report from the Boyle County Sheriff’s Office.

  • Chase ends in kidnapping, other charges

     

    A Taylor County man is in jail after being charged with kidnapping and numerous other charges in an incident that took place across at least three counties Thursday.

    Marion Fisher, 34, of Taylor County, is lodged in the Boyle County Detention Center in Danville, Ky. Fisher was arrested after a lengthy incident, according to a report from the Boyle County Sheriff's Office.

  • Drug court program helping get lives back on track

    "Drug court doesn't work for everybody," said Jennifer Caulk, who works for the drug court program serving Taylor County. "If you're not willing to say, 'I have a drug problem and I need help,' this is what drug court is about, no matter what your charge is."

  • Governor puts $82.5 million in 'rainy day' fund

    Gov. Steve Beshear Tuesday gave Kentuckians another boost of confidence in the state’s ongoing economic progress by placing $82.5 million of surplus into the “rainy day fund,” increasing the fund balance to $209.4 million.

    The $82.5 million surplus is the product of a 5.3 percent increase in general fund revenues for Fiscal Year 2015 from growth in individual income and sales taxes and business tax receipts.