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Today's Features

  • This year marks the 100th anniversary of the passage of the Smith-Lever Act, which formally established the national Cooperative Extension Service system.

    Across Kentucky, the University of Kentucky Cooperative Extension Service is celebrating ways that extension has helped clients change their lives for the better.

  • A memorial service will be hosted on Monday, May 26, to honor all veterans of the War of 1812 and to unveil a replacement stone for the late Stephen Harding.

    Harding, who served in the 3rd regiment of the Kentucky Detached Militia, died in Taylor County on Nov. 24, 1880. He was married to Lydia Carlisle and they had four children, James Harding, Nancy Harding Puryear, Sarah Jane Harding Cox and Elizabeth Harding Wright. He later married Jane Knifley and they had a daughter, Mary Elizabeth Harding Taylor.

  • Those who are expecting a child now or plan to expand their families in the future are invited to attend the Taylor Regional Hospital Baby Fair on Thursday, May 22, at the hospital from 5 to 7 p.m.

    Car seat safety checks will be performed performed by certified professionals from the Kentucky Department of Transportation. The inspections will begin at 4 p.m. on the day of the event.

    There will be a variety of educational booths at the fair, as well as speakers such as local physicians.

  • Goodwill is partnering with the local Red Cross organization to raise money to help families.

    For every pound of items the public donates to Goodwill on behalf of Red Cross, the organization will donate 23 cents to the local Red Cross. The money will be deposited into a bank account and Red Cross organizers will use the money to issue Goodwill certificates to families they help in emergencies. Those taking items to Goodwill on behalf of Red Cross must mention the group when donating.

    All donations to Goodwill are tax deductible.

  • Kasey Ricketts

    Campbellsville University

    Campbellsville University will display entries in the annual juried student art show through Wednesday, April 30.

    The entries will be on display at the Pence-Chowning Art Gallery. Entry is free.

    Works of painting, drawing, photography, ceramics, sculpture, graphic design and other media will be on display.

    The juror for the competition was professional artist Page Candler.

  •  

    It didn't take long. Once the adults said the word, the children ran to search for hidden treasure. And minutes later, all the eggs were found.

    Campbellsville Baptist Church hosted its annual community Easter egg hunt on Saturday.

    The event was at four locations, with more than 6,000 eggs hidden for children to find. Before the hunt, children played games and learned about the true meaning of the Easter holiday.

  •  

    The Campbellsville chapter of the Kentucky Federation of Business and Professional Women celebrated National Business Women's Week recently by recognizing the contributions of local working women and business owners, and those who support them, for their contribution toward improving working women's lives in our community.

    There are more than 7.2 million women-owned businesses in the United States.

  •  

    TEN YEARS AGO

    April 22, 2004

    Campbellsville Eagles baseball team won three games to capture the Fifth Region All "A" Classic over the weekend in Bardstown.

    A total of 87 entries signed in for the 2004 season opener at Bluegrass Speedway in Bardstown on Saturday and Tim Tungate of Campbellsville took top honors in the 25-lap late model feature event.

    Beth Clark has been named a United States National Collegiate Award winner in psychology.

  • Brittany and Bobby McMahan of Campbellsville announce the birth of a son, Keegan Allen McMahan, at 1:24 p.m. on March 31 at Spring View Hospital in Lebanon. He weighed 6 pounds, 14 ounces and was 20 inches long.

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    We all want to eat food that tastes good. One of the most common ways we tend to make food taste good is by adding salt. Unfortunately, most American diets are too high in sodium. Diets high in sodium can raise blood pressure, which can lead to many major health issues including heart disease. Herbs provide a great way for us to limit our sodium intake while still consuming flavorful foods.

    Herbs are also some of the easiest things to grow. The simplest way to start an herb garden is to buy plants and transfer them to a window box.