.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Today's Features

  • An auction and gospel singing to benefit Greensburg residents Wayne and Jane Pruitt is Saturday at the Exie Fire Department in Greensburg.

    Money collected will go toward Wayne Pruitt's medical expenses.

    Chili, beans, cornbread and hot dogs will be served at 5 p.m. ET. Homemade cakes and pies will be auctioned.

    Gospel singing, featuring the First Service Band, Gods Mighty Angels and Community Baptist Church Family, will begin at 6 p.m. ET.

    To donate a cake or pie to be auctioned, call (270) 932-3073 or (270) 432-4217.

  • Pfc. Brandon Smith graduated on Feb. 1 from Company B, 2nd Battalion, 81st Armor Regiment at Fort Knox.

    Smith attended both Campbellsville and Taylor County school systems and is currently stationed at Ft. Hood, Texas.

    He is the son of Linda Jenkins and Kelvin Mills.

  • Two Taylor Countians are among 30 leaders throughout South Central Kentucky who have been awarded fellowships by the University of Kentucky College of Agriculture to take part in the third class of the Kentucky Entrepreneurial Coaches Institute.

    Ann Beard and Holly Davis will receive a fellowship valued at $18,000 in the form of eight seminars lasting two to three days in length and a weeklong study tour throughout the Western United States. Fellows will learn from regional, national and international leaders in rural entrepreneurship while taking part in the Institute.

  • Campbellsville High School Class of 1987 celebrated its 20-year reunion on Dec. 29 at the All Occasions building. Pictured are, from left, front: Jill Ewing, Donna Ford, Rhonda Young, Kim Parson, Brent Garret, Cindy Munday, Jennifer Ewing and Stacey Browning. Back: Vince Nolley, Dean Wilson, Steve Shrader, Mike Fisher, Everick Lasley, Beth Hayes, Debbie Foley, Suzanne McCubbin, Beth Richardson, Daren Wilson, Carol Smith, Richard Powell, Troy Walters, Troy Edelen, Matthew Money, Lisa Leachman, Mike Blankenship, Clint Durham, Randy Rodgers and Joel Patton.

  • Taylor County Girl Scout Troop 2164 had a lesson in basic cake decorating, with the help of Julie Davis. They baked cupcakes and made butter cream icing. The scouts used food coloring, icing bags and tips to decorate heart-shaped cakes and cupcakes. Pictured are, from left, Hannah Reynolds, Erika Gaddie, Lauren Johnson, Katie Long, Jenna Corbin, Meredith Johnson, Julie Davis, Brooke Gilpin and Kimberly Davis.

  • Dawn K. Cox and Bryan David Neal, both of Campbellsville, will exchange wedding vows on Saturday, March 15.

    Cox is the daughter of Alice Kay Nicolet and Paul Leroy Trout. Her step-parents are Jonita Trout and David Nicolet.

    She is the owner of Dawn's Childcare in Campbellsville.

    Neal is the son of the late Juanita and the Rev. Kermit Neal.

    He is employed at Ernie's Carpets in Campbellsville.

  • Jacob Keith Moss is the 2-year-old son of Keith and Crystal Moss of Summersville. His grandparents are Bo Grant and Janice Grant, both of Campbellsville, and Roger and Vickie Moss of Summersville. Great-grandparents are Stanley Grant of Oklahoma City, Okla., Charles and Lillie Lobb and Mary Moss, all of Summersville, and the late Wanda Newton, Lee Roy and Florence Sallee and Harlan Moss.

  • Frank Page and Nell Tapscott Smith will celebrate their 65th wedding anniversary on March 6.

    The Smiths were married on March 6, 1943, by the Rev. F.A. Sanders. They have one son and daughter-in-law, Ray and Judy Smith; and one daughter and son-in-law, Jan and Mitch Feese.

    They also have four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren.

    Greeting cards may be sent to: 401 Charlemague Blvd., Apt. 208-C, Naples, Fla. 34112.

  • Area residents will have two chances next week to hear two views of Kentucky from different corners.

    Kentucky Poet Laureate Jane Gentry Vance will speak about "Creating the Soul of Kentucky: Kentucky Poems," on Tuesday, Feb. 26.

    And then on Thursday, Feb. 28, Amy L. Watts of the Kentucky Long-Term Policy Research Center will address "Progress and Investments in Kentucky Education: How Far Has Post-Reform Kentucky Progressed and What Are Cost-Effective Next Steps for Continued Progress?"

  • More than a half-century ago, they traveled thousands of miles from home to defend the world against tyranny. Many never returned. Those who survived World War II went on with their lives, contributing to the communities they call home.

    Time is catching up with these veterans. On average, 1,100 World War II veterans die each day, according to the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs. With them die their stories of courage during a time of great uncertainty and a challenge to global peace and democracy.