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Today's Features

  • The Big Brothers and Big Sisters fifth annual Bowl for Kids Sake will kick off with a luncheon Tuesday, Feb. 5.

    The lunch will be at Campbellsville University's Winters Dining Hall from 11:30 a.m. to 1 p.m.

    According to organizers, the event is for anyone wanting to form a team to participate or those who wish to become a sponsor.

    To RSVP, or for more information, contact Bob or Jackie at 465-2254 or Ricky Burress at 403-2154.

  • The Campbellsville High School track, tennis and softball teams will host the first annual Spring Sports Basketball Challenge on Saturday, Feb. 23.

    The event will start at 9 a.m. at Campbellsville Middle School and will be a tournament for all churches and non-profit organizations.

    All teams will be guaranteed two games and the first six teams to sign up will be guaranteed a spot.

    The entry fee is $100 per team and each team will be allowed a 10-player roster to be submitted prior to the tournament. There are no age categories.

  • Tommy Clark, left, professor of art at Campbellsville University, discusses a watercolor with Stan McKinney, assistant professor of journalism at CU, at Clark's art exhibit reception Jan. 28. Clark has an exhibit of watercolors, mixed media, sculptures and pottery. The exhibit, at the CU Art Gallery, is free and runs through Feb. 7.

  • Former U.S. Congresswoman Anne Northup will kick off a four-part special series for women Tuesday, Feb. 5 at Lindsey Wilson College.

    Northup will speak about "Competing in a Man's World" at 8 p.m. ET in V.P. Henry Auditorium. The talk is free and open to the public.

    Northup's talk begins with "Real Women, Real Beauty," a four-part series geared toward women in South central Kentucky.

    In addition to Northup's appearance, the series will feature fiction and poetry reading; a talk about women's identity; and a modern look at feminism.

  • St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 116 S. Columbia Ave., will present a series of programs during the Lenten season (40 days prior to Easter) titled "Caring for God's Creation."

    "We hope to encourage those attending to shape their own personal theology for understanding and caring for the many gifts God has given us - our land, our food chain, all of God's people, as a way of broadening our efforts to reach out to God's world," said the Rev. Karl Lusk, pastor.

  • Baptist Campus Ministries at Campbellsville University will host the 14th annual dinner theater, "Welcome to the Table," on Friday, Feb. 15 at 7 p.m. in the Winters Dining Hall of the E. Bruce Heilman Student Complex.

    The program, an oral and visual presentation including sounds and images from the CU historical archives, will be presented by Campbellsville University students.

    The cost will be $15 per person or $25 for a couple with all proceeds going toward domestic and international missions.

  • I am a recovering nice person. As a former nice person, I rarely said no to anything, even (and especially) to things I really, really, really didn't want to do.

    Because I couldn't stand the thought of someone possibly thinking badly of me for saying no, I've done some things I had no business doing - heading up committees, teaching a class, organizing a rummage sale.

  • Three local congregations will observe the beginning of the Lenten season, the 40 days preceding Easter, with an Ash Wednesday service at 7 p.m. on Feb. 6 at St. Thomas Episcopal Church, 116 S. Columbia Ave.

    Bethel First Presbyterian Church, Fannie Chapel Christian Methodist Episcopal Church and the host congregation will join in the traditional Ash Wednesday liturgy and imposition of ashes; the Rev. Jim Murphy, pastor of Bethel First Presbyterian Church, will be the preacher. Pastors Delmetria Cayson-Combs and Karl Lusk will be the worship leaders.

  • There's no required reading or test to be passed when two people decide to build a life together. Yet, according to Erik Carlton, project director of the University of Kentucky's Bluegrass Healthy Marriage Initiative, one of the most significant decisions people make is whom they are going to marry, and if that decision isn't made well, the relationship may not have much chance of lasting long.

  • Dr. William H. Turner, National Endowment for the Humanities Chair in Appalachian Studies at Berea College, will be the featured speaker at Campbellsville University's Black History Month chapel Wednesday, Feb. 6 at 10 a.m. in the Ransdell Chapel.

    The event is free and open to the public.

    "We are honored to have Dr. Turner with us to celebrate Black History Month," said John Chowning, vice president for church and external relations and executive assistant to the president.