Today's Features

  • Every summer, the Christian Bookseller's Association has a huge trade show where book publishers and sellers of religious gifts congregate and attempt to ply their wares to owners of Christian bookstores and gift shops.

    It's been a few years since I attended one, and even though this year's show was in nearby Orlando, I was out of town and didn't go.

    Consequently, I missed one of the most exquisitely enjoyable aspects of this trade show - the rows of Christian witness items, snarkily referred to by the publishing side of the building as "Jesus junk alley."

  • Benjamin Anderson celebrated his second birthday on July 13 with family and friends. He is the son of Josh and Crystal Anderson of Campbellsville.

  • Mannsville United Methodist Church will host a corn hole tournament on Saturday, Sept. 6.

    Registration begins at 1 p.m. with the tournament starting at 1:30.

    Team fee is $40. Prizes will be $200 for first place; $100 for second; and $50 for third.

    All proceeds from the tournament will go to the church's building fund.

    For more information, contact Amanda Wood at 469-9636 or Terri Gabehart at 789-2415.

  • The Calvary Heirs will be in concert on Sunday beginning at 6 p.m. at Woodlawn Christian Church in Campbellsville.

  • A memorial motorcycle ride for Mark "Jubb" Judd will be Saturday, Sept. 6 in Greensburg.

    Proceeds collected will be given to Donald W. and Brenda C. Judd for Mark Judd's funeral expenses.

    The ride will begin at the IGA parking lot with signups from 10 to 11 a.m. ET. The ride will end at Pleasant Ridge Baptist Church in Greensburg.

    Cost is $15 per bike and there will be a 50/50 drawing.

  • Campbellsville University President Michael V. Carter, who is beginning his 10th year as CU president, will deliver the first chapel of the fall semester Wednesday, Aug. 27 at 10 a.m. in the Ransdell Chapel. The public is invited to attend.

    "This is the first chapel of the new academic year, and it sets the tone for the school year," Carter said. "We invite our faculty, staff and students, as well as the public, to come hear about our plans for the new year and about our successful summer. Campbellsville University is on the move, and we want to share that good news."

  • New grants make it possible for cash-strapped agencies to bring important services into the community and get innovative ideas off the ground.

    Yet applying for and receiving grants can a competitive process.

    To help members of the non-profit community and government agencies decipher the intricacies of the grant process, the Lake Cumberland District Health Department and Lake Cumberland Children's Advocacy will host the Grantsmanship Training Program through Sept. 12 at the Lake Cumberland District Health Department in Somerset.

  • The Campbellsville High School Class of 2003 will have a five-year reunion on Saturday, Oct. 25.

    Invitations will be sent. Organizers would like to hear from classmates to compile a listing of current addresses.

    Those who have not been contacted about the reunion can contact Rachael Akin-Dobson at 789-0512 or Natalie Houk at 465-5415.

  • The Louisville Youth Orchestra will have auditions for its 50th anniversary season from Friday, Sept. 5 through Tuesday, Sept. 9. These auditions are for musicians through age 21 who play any orchestral instrument.

    Students should have a solo of about two minutes in length prepared for this audition and be ready to play selected scales.

    The LYO is comprised of six orchestras of varying ability levels ranging in age from 5 to 21.

  • The Kentucky Historical Society will host a cemetery preservation workshop from 8 a.m. to 5 p.m. on Saturday, Sept. 27 that will focus on protecting and preserving family burial grounds. Pre-registration is required by Friday, Sept. 19.

    Genealogists, preservationists, archeologists and government officials will discuss the increasing problem of safeguarding the cemeteries and burial grounds of the commonwealth. The workshop will be at the Thomas D. Clark Center for Kentucky History in Frankfort.