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More drug arrests made in Operation Black Friday

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15 of 19 locals charged have now been arrested

By Calen McKinney

 

More Taylor County residents have been arrested as part of a recent Kentucky State Police effort to get drugs off the streets.

Nineteen Taylor County residents have been charged with drug crimes as part of the effort. As of press time, 15 of them have been arrested. The indictments against the remaining four defendants remain sealed at press time.

The majority of the defendants appeared in Taylor Circuit Court on Tuesday, before Judge Allan Bertram or Judge Dan Kelly. They pleaded not guilty to the crimes and future court dates have been set.

KSP initiated Operation Black Friday early last Friday morning. In all, 479 people around the state have been charged with committing 774 crimes. The effort amounts to the largest drug roundup in the agency's history. At press time, more than 300 of the 479 have been arrested.

Twelve of the 19 charged in Taylor County were arrested on Friday. More were arrested over the weekend and on Tuesday.

Only seven counties in the state had more people charged in the drug roundup than Taylor County. The most arrests, 57, were made in Perry County. Arrests were made in nearly half of the commonwealth's 120 counties.

Arrest warrants for the 19 Taylor County residents were issued last month, though they were sealed after a Taylor County grand jury issued indictments against the defendants on Oct. 22.

A grand jury can seal an indictment if there is a possibility that the accused will try to evade police.

Campbellsville Police officers began making the arrests early Friday morning and continued throughout the day.

Campbellsville Police Chief Tim Hazlette said his officers helped KSP troopers with the arrests, but weren't involved with investigating and indicting the 19 defendants.

Hazlette said an attempt was made to arrest all 19 defendants on Friday.

"We'll continue to look for the ones we haven't found," he said.

To report crime, call the Campbellsville Police anonymous tip line at 465-7743.

 

Taylor County Residents Charged

As of Wednesday morning, 15 of the 19 residents charged in Operation Black Friday had been arrested. Four remain at large and indictments against them remain sealed at the Taylor Circuit Clerk's office.

Those arrested are:

• Christopher M. Grubaugh, 53, of 113 Layton Drive, was charged with second-degree selling 20 or more dosage units of a controlled substance.

Bond was set at $15,000 cash. If convicted, he could be sentenced to as much as five years in prison. Arraignment is set for Dec. 17.

• Nina Mikel, 48, of 240 Vintage Lane, was charged in two separate indictments with two counts of second-degree selling 20 or more dosage units of a controlled substance.

Bond was set at $10,000 cash in each case. She was ordered to not consume any drugs or alcohol or violate any laws. If convicted, Mikel could be sentenced to as much as 10 years in prison. Arraignment is scheduled for Nov. 26.

• Kenneth Mikel aka Possum Mikel, 61, of 240 Vintage Lane, was charged with second-degree selling 20 of more dosage units of a controlled substance.

Bond was set at $10,000 cash. He was ordered to not consume any illegal drugs or alcohol or violate any laws. If convicted, Mikel could be sentenced to as much as five years in prison. Arraignment was rescheduled for Nov. 26.

• Duane Thompson, 28, of 124 E. Walnut St., was charged in four separate cases with endangering the welfare of a minor and four counts of first-degree selling less than 4 grams of cocaine.

Bond was set at $6,000 unsecured. If convicted, he could be sentenced to as much as 20 years in prison. A discovery conference was scheduled for Dec. 3.

• Anthony Smith, 28, of 600 E. Broadway, Apt. D, was charged with first-degree selling less than 4 grams of a controlled substance and being a second-degree persistent felony offender.

Bond was set at $15,000 cash and he was ordered to not consume any illegal drugs or alcohol or violate the law. If convicted, Smith could be sentenced to as much as five years in prison. A bond hearing in Smith's was set for Dec. 3.

• Mitchell Strong, 56, of 339 Handley Ave., was charged in two separate cases with two counts of first-degree selling 10 or more dosage units, both his second or subsequent offenses.

Bond was set at 10 percent of $50,000 cash in both cases. If convicted, Strong could be sentenced to as much as 40 years in prison. A discovery conference was set for Dec. 3.

• Steven Burchett, 37, of 1409 S. Columbia Ave., was charged with first-degree selling 4 or more grams of cocaine, his second offense.

Bond was set at $30,000 cash. If convicted, Burchett could be sentenced to as much as 20 years in prison. His case set is set for review Dec. 17.

• Jeremy Holstin, 41, of 508 Coakley, was charged with second-degree selling 20 or more dosage units of a controlled substance and being a persistent felony offender.

Bond was set at $20,000 cash. If convicted, Holstin could be sentenced to as much as five years in prison. A pretrial hearing has been scheduled for Jan. 7.

• Robert Dotson, 32, of 113 Wilcox St., was charged in two separate cases with two counts of second-degree selling 20 or more dosage units and two counts of being a first-degree persistent felony offender.

Bond was set at $50,000 unsecured. If convicted, Dotson could be sentenced to as much as 10 years in prison. A discovery conference was scheduled for Dec. 3.

• Ryan O. Johnson, 32, of 106 E. Walnut St., was charged in two separate cases with two counts of first-degree selling less than 4 grams of cocaine, endangering the welfare of a minor and two counts of being a first-degree persistent felony offender.

Bond was set at $20,000 and $25,000 cash. If convicted, he could be sentenced to as much as 10 years in prison. A discovery conference was scheduled Nov. 26.

• Earl M. Owens, 58, of 404 Clem Haskins Blvd., was charged in three separate cases with three counts of first-degree selling less than 4 grams of cocaine and three counts of being a first-degree persistent felony offender.

Bond was set at $10 percent of $10,000 and Owens was ordered to not consume any alcohol or illegal drugs or violate the law. If convicted, he could be sentenced to as much as 15 years in prison. A pretrial conference was scheduled for Jan. 7.

• Travis D. Owens, 34, of 404 Clem Haskins Blvd., was charged in three separate cases with three counts of first-degree selling less than 4 grams of cocaine and three counts of being a first-degree persistent felony offender.

Bond was set at 10 percent of $10,000 and Owens was ordered to not consume any alcohol or illegal drugs or violate the law. If convicted, he could be sentenced to as much as 15 years in prison. A pretrial conference was scheduled for Jan. 7.

• Nathaniel L. Cubit, 33, of 122 Greenhill Drive, was charged in two separate cases with two counts of first-degree selling less than 4 grams of cocaine, both his second offenses.

Bond was set at 10 percent of $10,000 and Cubit was ordered to not consume any alcohol or illegal drugs or violate the law. If convicted, he could be sentenced to as much as 20 years in prison. A pretrial conference was scheduled for Jan. 7.

• Brittany A. Rednour, 24, of 124 E. Walnut St., was charged in two separate cases with two counts of first-degree selling less than 4 grams of cocaine and endangering the welfare of a minor.

Bond was set at 10 percent of $25,000. If convicted, she could be sentenced to as much as 10 years in prison. A bond hearing was scheduled for Nov. 26.

The charge of being a persistent felony offender could increase any sentence a defendant might receive.

Information about the remaining four defendants who have been charged will be published when they are arrested and indictments against them are unsealed.

• An indictment is a legal accusation only. It does not establish guilt.