.....Advertisement.....
.....Advertisement.....

Local man pleads guilty to sex crimes

-A A +A
By Calen McKinney

 

The Campbellsville man charged with sodomizing a 10-year-old girl has pleaded guilty and could spend 12 years in prison for his crime.

James A. Loy, 24, of 341 Ebenezer Road, was indicted by a Taylor County grand jury during a special session in April.

Loy was charged with first-degree sodomy and first-degree sexual abuse, both of an alleged victim younger than 12.

Loy appeared before Taylor Circuit Court Judge Allan Bertram on Aug. 27. Records from his appearance were filed into Taylor Circuit Court records on Sept. 16.

Loy pleaded guilty to first-degree sodomy by forcible compulsion and first-degree sexual abuse of a victim younger than 12.

In exchange for his guilty plea, Commonwealth's Attorney Shelly Miller has recommended that Loy be sentenced to serve 12 years in prison.

Miller also recommended that Loy register as a sex offender after his release and be ordered to complete a sex offender treatment program. She also recommended that he be ordered to not have contact with his victim or her family.

Formal sentencing is set for Nov. 19.

According to court records, the plea agreement was reached during a mediation settlement with prosecution and defense attorneys, the victim and members of the victim's family.

According to Loy's arrest citation, Taylor County Sheriff's Deputy Mark Dickens was contacted in March after the girl reported that Loy had abused her. Records state that Loy agreed to an interview with Dickens about the girl's accusations.

Loy told Dickens, according to court records, that sometime in January, he was sleeping with the girl and sodomized her.

Later in March, Loy told Dickens, he was again sleeping with the girl and rubbed her genitals with his hand while she was clothed.

According to court records, Loy told investigators that he knew the punishment for the crimes he had committed and that he needs help.

Miller didn't return a request for comment on Loy's case before press time. However, as policy, Miller typically doesn't comment on cases before defendants are sentenced.

Shanda West-Stiles of the Department of Public Advocacy in Columbia represented Loy. She didn't return a phone call before press time to comment for this story.

If convicted by a jury of his original charges, Loy could have been sentenced to as much as life in prison.